What the Mughals really took from India

Recently, I took to Twitter to pose the following question to people: can you name a major scientific advance that came out of India during the times of the Delhi Sultanate / Mughal Empire?

Before this period, we can name several discoveries, such as Sushruta and his tools for surgery, the invention of the modern number system and the (so called) Pythagoras Theorem. Again, after this period ends, we see the scientific discoveries emerging: Jagdish Bose sending radio signals, the Raman effect and Ramanujan’s discovery of mock theta functions. So what happened in between?

To make sure we are being a bit more systematic about this, let me refer you to the Wikipedia page on inventions and discoveries on the Indian subcontinent. There is the odd exception here and there, but the pattern is unmistakable. India stops creating new knowledge somewhere around the 1200s. The search for knowledge restarts in the 1800s. In between, there is an era of darkness. This is the exact period when the West walks into the Enlightenment. By the time things change in India, we have a knowledge deficit of five or six centuries.

It is not enough to simply make this observation and then draw a conclusion about the effect of the Delhi Sultanate / Mughal Empire on India. You might ask: what if this was just a coincidence? How can you be sure that without the Muslim rulers, India would have followed a similar path of scientific/technical discoveries and ultimately the industrial revolution?

Well, nothing can be predicted with absolute certainty, especially not alternative history. But we can point out specific mechanisms by which these regimes stifled the creation of knowledge in India.

Temples are not just temples. The obsession of Muslim rulers with destroying temples had the effect of wiping out centers of learning.

The University of Oxford is so old that nobody knows exactly when it was established. However, what we do know is that religious sects of various orders settled in the general area which gradually coalesced into a university. This overlap of religion with centers of scientific learning has a long history. In Europe, many discoveries began with priests and monks of various religious orders. Gregor Mendel, the father of genetics, was an Austrian priest. The idea of the scientific method is often credited to Sir Francis Bacon and he studied under the Archbishop of Canterbury. The insignia of great and famous universities in the West, even academic titles such as PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) bear all the markings of this connection between religion and science. The language of religion and the language of science used to be the same. Newton wrote in Latin.

The reason for this overlap was simple: the religious authorities were the only people who had leisure time. The idea of the modern, secular university came much later.

In fact, even later than we might think. When Rockefeller founded the University of Chicago in 1890, his aim was to have a college for Baptists in the Midwest. The University was founded under the auspices of the American Baptist Education Society. Think about the amount of new knowledge that has been created at the University of Chicago ever since.

What happened in India? When Nalanda University was destroyed by Bakhtiyar Khilji around the year 1200, it wiped out what could have become the equal of Oxford. Each time a temple town like Kashi or Mathura was raided and its temples destroyed, a center of learning ceased to exist.

This is what the Delhi Sultanate and the Mughal Empire really took from India. They might not have carted away gold and silver over impossibly long distances in an era when transportation and roads barely existed. But what they cost us was potentially much more valuable than gold and silver. They cost us the discovery of new knowledge.

I was led to this realization in an organic fashion, starting from the observation that the Mughal Empire had no navy worth its name. The Mughal Empire was so rich and powerful that it should truly be considered a superpower. Yet, the Portuguese Navy of the time dominated Indian waters, giving protection to the Mughals. Now contrast this with the Chola Empire, which had a blue water navy of a million men and dominated the entire swathe of Southeast Asia.

In short, the Sultanate and the Mughals lacked vision. The fanatical suppression of “non-believers” in the empire sapped all their energies. Kashi could not become a hub of creating new knowledge. Instead, there were pilgrim taxes to keep people from entering the city. There was a ban on construction of new temples. No new centers of learning could be built and focus remained on weakening, humiliating and destroying the existing ones.

By the 1800s, it was too late. The rest of the world had moved too far ahead.

Any king can defeat an enemy in war. But the king who goes to war against knowledge comes out as the ultimate loser.

9 thoughts on “What the Mughals really took from India

  1. Let me had my “correction” to the line “Any king can defeat an enemy in war. But the king who goes to war against knowledge comes out as the ultimate loser.”. Not the “king”, but the “nation”, “society”, “people” is the loser !! Why do I say so ? Well firstly. does the king “feel” like a loser (“ultimately” or otherwise). Of course not !! Coz otherwise they wouldnt be going down that path, and certainly not their descendants. And/or at some point they will pause and “reinvent” themselves to be true “society builders” (not unheard of in History, actually). For “kings” such as these, winning battles, and wars, ruling vast kingdoms & empires, amassing wealth, having large harems, being the “alpha male” in short, is the be all and end all. Be remembered (only) as the “Sikandar”, “Alamgir”, what not !! Its like the “average” modern day politician who will not see beyond the next election !!! This may seem like quibbling, but I dont think so, since this is the reason why India (and perhaps other societies) remained in darkness for centuries. Sikandars and Alamgirs, and their descendants. who do not think beyond their primal need to fight and win bloody wars !!! They “win”, but society loses !!!

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  2. I know what your detractors would say in response to the question you pose in your first paragraph: BIRIYANI ! That along with “naach-gaan” variously given enormous popularity by Bollywood and architecture, unfortunately, is the sum-total of the Mughal contribution in India.

    But it’s not just in India that Islam foreclosed on learning. Think about Europe.

    Islam was on an ascendent there with the Ottoman Empire literally cutting a swathe across southern Europe, all the way to Spain on the Atlantic from the 7th to the 10th centuries. This elicited a series of Crusades by the orthodox churches during the 11th to 15th centuries in the Levant, northern Africa, and southern Europe. Not all of them succeeded, but Europe was regained from Greece to Spain. Up until this point, Islam had marked its outposts with grandiose mosques and art, but little else that one would normally expect as scientific offshoots of architecture and engineering required in the building of mosques (such as with temples in the Hindu realm that gave rise to advanced mathematical concepts in the design of yagna shalas, computation relating to constellations, etc). All this had to await the Renaissance in mainland Europe that followed the brutal Crusades and reformation, starting in around the 17th century.

    The renaissance happened in a Christian Europe – albeit one where the main religion was intensely against the emerging ideas and philosophies. Islam had no role as it had retreated. But even where it still reigned supreme – in the East, Levant, Arabia, and north Africa – there was no equivalent to the Renaissance.

    The Moghuls are certainly not an aberration but a characteristic of Islamic rule anywhere where the focus was on getting rid of the local religions, many of them pagan, through forced conversions, building mosques, and the fostering of entertainment arts. Science or other areas of knowledge had minimal role to play. Even where “Arabic” ideas emerged in Europe, they were mere couriers from further East (India, China) with Occidental academic scholars giving lazy credit to the Arabs for what were essentially scholarly output of non-Islamic peoples in lands much further to the east.

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  3. The answer lies in just extrapolating the scientific achievement of today’s Muslims to say 800 years older generation of Muslims. In fact, if the oil reserve was not found in the Muslim world, the Muslims of the world would have been living in a pre-historic lifestyle. The important question is why Hindus stop using their brains after the arrival of the Mughals? The answer could be that when you are living in survival mode you cannot think about anything creative.

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  4. “The University of Oxford is so old that nobody knows exactly when it was established.”

    It’s 2020 and you’re still having these half-baked realizations. If you’re really interested in the subject, please read Rajiv Malhotra on the subject. His work is comprehensive and seminal, and by now it has seeped into the mainstream. It’s a bit late in the day to be coming up with these partially-correct ‘realizations in an organic fashion’

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  5. Hinduism took root in India because the terrain, weather, geography – everything favours this mode of thinking. This is the reversion to the mean that will happen and is happening.

    The lack of knowledge orientedness is costing Islamic society heavily and today a small country with technology lead like Israel can hold off the entire Arab world.

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  6. Hinduism took root in India because the terrain, weather, geography – everything favours this mode of thinking. This is the reversion to the mean that will happen and is happening.

    The lack of knowledge orientedness is costing Islamic society heavily and today a small country with technology lead like Israel can hold off the entire Arab world.

    Like

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